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Anonymous said: My question for you: I have trouble when it comes to creating place names for cities/towns in my character's world. Any advice/tips? 

characterandwritinghelp:

Check out our super-fabulous naming tag and our first Writer SOS post about naming people and places (honesty time: I waited to answer this question because I was still researching and completing that post!).

When it comes to naming cities and towns, there are a few naming conventions you can observe if you so choose. You can name it:

  • After a part of its surrounding geography (after a natural feature or in geographical relation to something else)
  • After its founder or a prominent historical figure
  • After what the town does or serves as (such as Coalville)
  • After nothing at all, and use a name you happen to like

Alternatively, you can decide to create a name completely from scratch. There are no rules for creating names. You can:

  • Create a set of rules (or if you have an established conlang, use those)
  • Use conlang rules and words with the above naming conventions
  • Pluck a name from thin air
  • Smash letters together and rearrange them into a readable/pronounceable order

Naming places is tough, I hope this helps you out of your rut.

-Headless

Posted: 1 day ago with 79 notes

45 Things I Want to See More of in Stories (Post-Apocalyptic Edition)

elumish:

  1. Leftover inconveniences (braces, casts, etc.)
  2. Renewable energy
  3. Creative attempts at fuel
  4. Cooperation
  5. Warlords
  6. Increased infant mortality
  7. Change in hierarchy (laborers more important than white-collar workers, etc.)
  8. New governmental structures
  9. Mercenary groups
  10. Formation of…
Posted: 2 days ago with 3,359 notes

Common Medieval Clothing Colors

theticklishpear:

This is meant as an information resource for creative folk, not a complete guide. Be sure to supplement this with additional research. Find the rest of the series, including the previous posts on clergy, nobility, common medieval jobs, divination, spirit…

Posted: 1 week ago with 294 notes

Writing Research - Ancient Rome

ghostflowerdreams:

Ancient Rome was an Italic civilization that began on the Italian Peninsula as early as the 8th century BC. Located along the Mediterranean Sea and centered on the city of Rome, it expanded to become one of the largest empires in the ancient world with an estimated 50 to…

Posted: 1 week ago with 3,434 notes

Ten Rules for Query Letters

maggie-stiefvater:

1. People overthink queries. Okay, so they are the only thing that an agent or editor might ever see of your work. So they have to embody everything about your personality and your books personality in a single page. So you will get absolutely nowhere if your queries…

Posted: 1 week ago with 1,442 notes
gunslingerannie:

europeansdomusicalsbetter:



stockade:



You’re welcome










This is the most useful thing I’ve ever reblogged.

gunslingerannie:

europeansdomusicalsbetter:

stockade:

You’re welcome

This is the most useful thing I’ve ever reblogged.

(Source: gyarados)

Fighting Words

clevergirlhelps:

Attack

Advance, assail, assault, beset, charge, drive, foray, hurtle, launch, lunge, maul, press forward, push, rush, storm, surge

Break

Blast, breach, carve, cleave, cleft, crack, cripple, crunch, demolish, destroy, disable, disfigure, disintegrate, divide,…

World Building Considerations: Cities

thewritingcafe:

Creating a world from scratch can be overwhelming, but having an understanding of how societies form can be quite helpful. Here is a basic overview of how cities form.

The Origin

So how do cities pop up? Humans were nomadic for thousands of years before they learned to…

Anonymous said: do you have a list or know of a list that has literary agents/agencies that have tumblr blogs? thanks!! 

characterandwritinghelp:

slitheringink:

thewritingcafe:

I couldn’t find much. You can find a lot more lit agents on twitter and I think everyone listed here also has a twitter.

Laurie Abkemeier

  • (From website): She is currently most interested in narrative nonfiction about remarkable individuals or achievements in the areas of history, sports, science, nature, sociology, and technology, and prescriptive nonfiction that is research-based. She is also interested in hearing from artists and illustrators with book ideas.

Hannah Bowman

  • (From website): Hannah specializes in commercial fiction, especially science fiction and fantasy, young adult fiction, women’s fiction, cozy mysteries, and romance. Hannah is also interested in nonfiction, particularly in the areas of mathematics, science and religion (especially history and sociology of Christianity).

Diana Fox

  • (From Publisher’s Marketplace): I am actively seeking the following: young adult fiction (all genres), science fiction/fantasy, romance, historical fiction, thrillers, and graphic novels. I’m always interested in books that cross genres and reinvent popular concepts with an engaging new twist (especially when there’s a historical and/or speculative element involved). On the nonfiction side I’m interested in memoirs, biography, and smart narrative nonfiction; I particularly enjoy memoirs and other nonfiction about sex work, addiction and recovery, and pop culture.

HSG Agency

  • Multiple agents looking for YA, middle grade, adult fiction, picture book, and non-fiction writers. Specific genres for each agent is listed on their website.

New Leaf Literary

  • Multiple agents. Genres are listed here.

Rebecca Friedman

  • (From website): Looking for literary novels of suspense, women’s fiction, contemporary romance, and young adult, as well as journalistic non-fiction and memoir.

Eric Nelson

  • I can’t find his exact genres, but I’m pretty sure it’s mostly non fiction. You’ll have to look at his books and his twitter.

PS Literary Agency

  • Multiple agents. All literary agents and what they’re looking for are listed on the main website, which is listed on their tumblr blog.

Regal Literary

  • We represent works in a wide range of categories, with an emphasis on literary fiction, outstanding thriller and crime fiction, and serious narrative non-fiction. Specific agents can be found here.

Sarah Such Literary Agency

  • Literary and commercial fiction and non-fiction, including Y/A and children’s books.

For later.

You might also want to check out the agentandeditorwishlist Tumblr. It has been inactive for a while, but it might point you in the direction of an agent or editor that will click with your story.

-Headless

Posted: 2 weeks ago with 647 notes